9 Tips to Help You Move with Houseplants

A woman cares for plants in home.

According to Webmd.com, houseplants act as natural filters to catch allergens and other airborne particles. In layman’s terms, rooms with houseplants have less dust and mold than rooms without. Other benefits of houseplants, besides aesthetic appeal, include first aid, relaxation, air purification and more! So, whether or not you have a green thumb, you have a reason to make a trip to your local nursery! But now that you have a move scheduled, there are steps to take to ensure your houseplants arrive at the new destination safely. Here are nine tips to help you before, during and after a move.

  1. Transfer into plastic holders: Transfer plants from decorative pots into plastic holders to avoid breaking. Wrap breakable decorative pots in paper, bubble wrap or linens and pack tightly away for the move.
  2. Inspect plants: Inspect and treat any plants with pests. You don’t want to transfer them to your next destination.
  3. Prune away: Keep your plants healthy and looking better by trimming back any dead or protruding limbs.
  4. Large plants: The safest way to move with large plants is to use packing paper or sheets to gently cover them. This will help protect leaves, limbs and branches from bending or breaking during the move. If moving during chilly temperatures, this will also help protect the plant from the cold.
  5. Pack in boxes: To help avoid plants from falling over, place them snugly in appropriately sized boxes. Place newspaper or bubble wrap around the base of the plant so it won’t shift during the move.
  6. Extended travel: If traveling more than a few days for your move, avoid putting plants in the trunk of your vehicle. Keep them near a window if possible so the plants have sunlight and fresh air to keep them healthy.
  7. Unpack first: Unpack your plants first when you arrive to your new destination. Remember plants are living things so they need to breathe and adjust to the new environment.
  8. Remove from box: If a large plant is stored in a box, cut the bottom of the box and carefully lift the box over the top so it will slide with the grain of the leaves and branches to avoid breakage.
  9. Adjustment period: Once you have moved in and established a location for your plant, water it on a regular basis and give it time to adjust to its new environment. It should recover and acclimate to its new surroundings in a few days and continue to thrive.

Continue enjoying the many benefits of your houseplants by reducing the risk of damage during a move with these nine tips. And remember, if you need to store some items that aren’t making the move with you, consider a climate-controlled facility with Zippy Shell! We can also help you make a local or long-distance move possible! Whatever you needs, Zippy Shell makes moving and storage simple.

Plants That Will Purify Your Home

Adding some of these plants to your home will help better the air quality in your home as well as create an aesthetic.

Aloe plant

While being known for soothing dry skin and burns, aloe is also good for the air. It helps clear the air pollutants found in chemical products used within your home.

English Ivy

Ivy is a great plant to add some beauty to your living space. They can climb structures and can grow along walls. This is great for an indoor space along a wall and does not require too much sunlight.

Peace Lily

Lilies are one of the few houseplants that will bloom indoors. Add this pop of color to your household during any season. Its high transpiration rate will also humidify your air.

Boston Fern

Ferns remove more formaldehyde than any other plant. The only catch is that these plants require a lot of attention, so you may have to water them daily.

Spider Plant

This easy-to-grow plant is one of the most effective plants at fighting off toxins like carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and benzene.

Red-Edged Dracaena

This beautiful plant can grow up to ceiling height (up to 15 feet) so it is great at filling in spaces. It also removes pollutants including trichloroethylene and xylene.