Moving with Pets

Our pets can be susceptible to any changes in their day-to-day lives—no matter how minor the differences are. If you have a move coming up, they will likely notice a shift in the household energy far before your scheduled moving day. So don’t be surprised if you see them acting a little anxious as you pack and prepare to move from your home. If you have a move with pets coming up, take a look at some of our helpful tips and guidelines for a smooth and stress-free transition.

How Much Does It Cost to Relocate a Pet?

There shouldn’t be too many additional costs to prepare for if you drive to your new home instead of flying. However, you may want to invest in some items that can make your pet more comfortable in the vehicle if you do not own them already. For instance, a travel crate will ensure that your pet is safe and comfortable during a long trip. If you do not have room in your car for a crate, you should use a car harness to ensure they are secure. This will protect them in the case of an accident and keep them from jumping out of the car when the door is open.

You will likely incur additional costs if you take your pets on a plane to get to your new home. Every airline has different pet policies, so we encourage you to thoroughly research the fees and policies of each airline BEFORE you book your tickets. If you have plans to stay in a hotel during your trip, you should also be sure to find one that is pet-friendly and be prepared for an additional charge. Some hotels will not charge for pets under a certain weight, but you should speak to a representative before booking.

How Do you Move Long-Distance with a Pet?

Whether you are moving locally or long-distance with your pet, you must prepare to ensure you have a successful transition from one home to another. We are big fans of checklists and schedules—they are a great way to make sure everything that needs to get done is completed promptly. For a move with pets, we recommend creating a task and reminder list separated by the significant “moments” of the move: before the move, moving day, and settling into the new home.

Before You Move

The weeks leading up to your move may be the most critical part of this process. So here are some things you should have on your list as you prepare for moving day.

  1. Microchips and tags: If your pet isn’t microchipped or wearing a collar with detailed tags, we would advise you to have this done before moving day. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for a pet to slip out of the home on moving day. Doors tend to get left open as people move things out, and our pets can sneak out unnoticed. If this does happen, you will be grateful that your pet has identifying information so someone can get them back to you.
  2. Schedule a vet visit: It can be good to ensure your pet is caught up on their vaccines and physical exam before your move. You may need some time to find a new vet in your new hometown, so making sure they are healthy and up to date on their shots is recommended. In addition, now is an excellent time to get a refill on any needed medications, and if your pet is a nervous traveler, you can ask your vet for some calming meds for the trip.
  3. Schedule boarding or a pet sitter: If you have a trusted pet sitter or local boarding facility, consider scheduling a mini-vacation for your pet for moving day. Pets can get particularly antsy on moving days due to the stress and movement. Not only do some pets run away, but some pets will also get into food and other items that can be dangerous for them.

Moving Day With Your Pet

If you are keeping your pets home on moving day, we recommend making sure they have a room to be kept comfortable and secure. This will help ensure they cannot leave home or get into things that can harm them. You can secure them in a room with some of their favorite toys and keep that door shut while you are busy moving things outside. Tape a sign to the door so everyone helping knows to keep that door shut. Don’t forget to leave out your pet’s food, treats, bowls, toys, and medications you will need on the trip.

Considerations for Moving with a Dog

Unlike cats, dogs will need to go outside to use the bathroom. They also need to go on walks to work out their energy. When we get busy moving, it can be hard to remember that they depend on us to take them out for walks and use the bathroom. If you need to, set reminders on your phone to make sure that your pups get to go outside frequently during the day.

Considerations for Moving with a Cat

Cats are not typically used to staying in a carrier. It can be a problem for some cats who have issues with being kept in small spaces. If you know that your cat panics in a small carrier (like when you travel to your vet visits), you may want to train them in the weeks leading up to your move. You can do this by leaving your carrier out during this time and encouraging them to spend time there. You can place their favorite treats and toys in the carrier to make it a comfortable and inviting space for them.

Settling In Your New Home

When you get to your new home, you may have to give it a good deep cleaning to rid the house of any scents left by the previous owners and their pets. Don’t be too alarmed if you notice your pets acting moody, depressed, or anxious in your new home. They have had their whole world turned upside down, so adjusting to their new surroundings may take some time. They just need some love and attention to get used to their new residence.

Zippy Shell is Here for You

We can’t move your pet for you, but we can help make your move as easy and stress-free as possible. Our mobile storage and moving solutions are perfect for a self-paced move. So give us a call at 888-947-7974 for more information and a free estimate.

We look forward to hearing from you!